Helmets save two things – cash and lives!

RACQ Capricorn Helicopter Rescue Service at the scene of a motorcycle accident 5 miles north of Banana. The motorcyclist was hit from behind, at speed by a sedan and sustained multiple injuries including possible spinal and neck injuries.

The RACQ Capricorn Helicopter Rescue Service urges all riders to wear the correct protective gear following yesterday’s retrieval of an injured motor cyclist who was not suitably attired nor wearing a helmet.

The 43 year old male sustained suspected significant head and spinal injuries after crashing in Wowan last night. He was airlifted to Rockhampton Hospital in a serious but stable condition.

Dave Paterson, RACQ CHRS Air Crewman says “The extent of head injuries sustained by last night’s motor cyclist, who was not wearing a helmet at the time of crashing, highlights the importance of the use of protective wear. The outcome for this rider, had he been wearing a helmet and protective clothing, could have been significantly more positive”.

RACQ spokesperson Renee Smith said it was vital riders wore helmets every time they hit the road.

“Riders who don’t wear helmets are twice as likely to suffer brain injuries and are two to three times more likely to die than those who do wear a helmet,” Ms Smith said.

“Apart from the obvious safety benefits, wearing a helmet is also the law – you’ll be hit with a $365 fine and three demerit points for not wearing one in Queensland.

“Find a helmet that fits correctly and do it up properly each time you ride – after all, it’s your life you’re putting at risk if you don’t.”

“Historically, around 42% of the total Primary Vehicle Accidents that we attend involve motor cycles with suspected spinal and neck injuries the most common outcome for the rider. Whilst wearing the correct protective gear, including a helmet, does greatly improve their chances of surviving a serious accident, all riders are encouraged to act in a responsible manner both on and off road to prevent an incident occurring. At the end of the day prevention is still the best cure” said RACQ CHRS spokesperson Kirsty Wooler.